Tag Archives: Buddhist Flag Day

8th January in Dalit History – Buddhist Flag Day


8th Jan8th January

Read more about Buddhist Flag and what its different colors represent from here.

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Filed under Buddha, Buddhism, Dalit, Dalit History, Dr B R Ambedkar, Today in Dalit History

8th January in Dalit History – Buddhist Flag Day


8th January: Buddhist Flag Day

The Buddhist flag is a modern creation and it was jointly designed by Mr J.R. de Silva and Colonel Henry Steele Olcott (American journalist) to mark the revival of Buddhism in Ceylon (presently Sri Lanka) in 1880. They designed a flag from the six colours of the aura that shone around the body and head of the Buddha after His Enlightenment. The Buddhist flag and American flag were draped on Colonel’s dead body in 1907 before his cremation.

The flag later came to symbolize the unity of Buddhists. Thereafter, it has been used worldwide and has been used in nearly 60 countries during Buddhist festive seasons, particularly during the Vesak celebrations.  The Buddhist Flag was first hoisted in 1885 in Sri Lanka. It is a symbol of faith and peace used throughout the world to represent the Buddhist faith and to mark the revival of Buddhism. It was accepted as the International Buddhist Flag by the 1952 World Buddhist Congress.

There are five vertical stripes of red, yellow, blue, white and orange. The sixth colour is a compound of the first five, but for design purposes its five ingredients are all shown in small horizontal stripes on the flag.

The horizontal bars signify peace and harmony between all races through out the world. The vertical bars represent eternal peace within the world.

In simple terms, the Buddhist Flag implies that there is no discrimination of races, nationality, areas or skin colour; that every living being possess the Buddha Nature and all have the potential to become a Buddha. The colours symbolise the perfection of Buddhahood and the Dharma.

The Blue light that radiated from the Buddha’s hair symbolises the spirit of Universal Compassion for all beings. It also represents the noble quality of “confidence” of the Buddha.

The Yellow light that radiated from the Buddha’s epidermis symbolises the Middle Path which avoids all extremes and brings balance and liberation. It also represents the noble quality of “holiness” of the Buddha.

The Red light that radiated from the Buddha’s flesh symbolises the blessings that the practice of the Buddha’s Teaching brings. It signifies achievement, wisdom, virtue, fortune and dignity. It also represents the noble quality of “wisdom” of the Buddha.

The White light that radiated from the Buddha’s bones and teeth symbolises the purity of the Buddha’s Teaching and the liberation it brings. It also represents the noble quality of “purity” of the Buddha.

The Orange light that radiated from the Buddha’s palms, heels and lips symbolises the unshakable Wisdom of the Buddha’s Teaching. It also represents the noble quality of “absence of desire” of the Buddha.

Buddhist flag

8 Jan 1934: Dr. Ambedkar returned by Victoria to Bombay (presently Mumbai) from London’s round table conference. [1]

He was in high spirits and talked gaily with his friends and admirers. In an interview which he gave at the Pier he said that the Joint Committee might modify the proposals made in the White Paper, but, in the main, they would be accepted. “We should accept them and agitate for more. I will not sit with folded hands hands and do nothing”, he added.

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Filed under Buddhism, Caste Discrimination, Dalit-Bahujans, Dr B R Ambedkar, Today in Dalit History