Category Archives: Mahatma Jotiba Phule

11th June in Dalit History – Mahatma Phule Vastu Sangrahalaya, Pune came into picture


11 June 1968: The Mahatma Phule Vastu Sangrahalaya, Poona, Act, 1968 was enacted as Maharashtra Act No XVIII of 1968.

As per the Act Lord Reay Maharashtra Industrial Museum at Poona was renamed as the Mahatma Phule Vastu Sangrahalaya. The Act extends to the activities of the Museum to make better provision for the management and maintenance.

P.S. – Do you have anything related to Dalit-History and want to share with all of us? Please send us here or post in the comments. Thank you.

Leave a comment

Filed under Dalit History, Dr B R Ambedkar, Latest, Mahatma Jotiba Phule, Today in Dalit History

11th June in Dalit History – Mahatma Jyotiba Phule wrote letter to the conference of Marathi authors


11 June 1885: Dyanodaya newspaper published letter by Mahatma Jyotiba Phule to the conference of Marathi authors.

The second annual Marathi literary conference was held on 24 May 1885 in the Sarvajanik Hall in Pune (Maharasthra), under the president ship of Krishnashastri Rajwade, and attended by nearly 300 litterateurs. Justice M G Ranade, the organizer of the conference wrote to Mahatma Jyotiba Phule requesting him to participate in the plenary session. Mahatma did not. But he sent a reply to Ranade, Some 43 letters from those who could not attend were read out among which Mahatma Jyotiba Phule’s letter came first. Mahatma’s letter clearly expressed his ideology in short, succinct words. Hitherto a discussion on the problems of the poor had rarely been awarded an important place in Marathi literature.[1] The letter was subsequently published in Dyanodaya newspaper of 11 June 1885. The letter is as follows:

Dear Sir,

I acknowledge the receipt of your letter regarding the proposed conference of the (Marathi) authors and I was delighted to receive your request that I should participate in this conference. But then esteemed sir, the conferences and the books of those who refuse to think of human rights generally, who do not concede them to others and going by their behavior are unlikely to concede them in future, cannot make sense to us, they cannot concur with what we are trying to say in our books. The reason is that their ancestors, with the view to taking revenge on us, included in their pseudo-religious texts an account of how they turned us into slaves and thus gave our enslavement religious authority. Their dated and decadent texts are witness to this phenomenon. These upper-caste authors who are forever miles away from reality and who can only make ceremonial and meaningless speeches in big meetings can never understand what we the shudras and atishudras have to suffer and what calamities we have to undergo. All this is not entirely unknown to the high-caste founders of various conferences and organizations. They pretend to be modernists as long as they are in the service of the British government. The moment they retire and claim their pensions, they get into their brahmanical touch-me-not attire, become caste chauvinists, incorrigible idol worshippers and, what is worse, treat the shudras and atishudras as lowly and contemptible. If they happen to be in their touch-me-not ritual dress they would not even touch paper notes as if that were a blasphemy! How can these Arya brahmans improve the lot of this unfortunate land? Be that as it may. We shudras do not any longer wish to trust these people and their specious and dishonest stories, for they cheat us and eat off our labor. In a word, we shudras have nothing to gain by mixing with such people. We must think about our situation and how we should relate to these upper-caste people. If these leaders of men are genuinely interested in unifying all people they must address themselves to the discovery of the root of eternal love of all human beings. Let them discover it and may be formulate and publish it as a text. Otherwise to turn a blind eye to the divisions among the human beings at this hour is simply futile. Of course, they are free to do what they like. I would nevertheless be thankful if my short letter is placed before your conference for consideration. In any case accept the salute of this old man.

Your friend

Jotirao. G. Phule.  

This is another example of how Phule always related to all problems keeping in mind what in his view was the main contradiction in contemporary society. His use of this kind of language would certainly have shocked the contemporary brahmins.

P.S. – Do you have anything related to Dalit-History and want to share with all of us? Please send us here or post in the comments. Thank you.

Leave a comment

Filed under Dalit History, Dr B R Ambedkar, Latest, Mahatma Jotiba Phule, Today in Dalit History

1st June (1873) in Dalit History – Mahatma Jyotirao Phule published Gulamgiri book


Mahatma Jyotirao Govindrao Phule published Powada: Chatrapati Shivajiraje Bhosle Yancha on 1st June 1869 and Gulamgiri on 1st June 1873.

Get – Slavery/Gulamgiri book by Mahatma Jotiba Phule in Hindi and English

11187153_1657832404446528_1696184235062017152_o

Mahatma Jyotirao Govindrao Phule

 

Check also –

Leave a comment

Filed under Dalit History, Dr B R Ambedkar, Mahatma Jotiba Phule, Today in Dalit History, Today in History

Dalit History Month – Remembering Mahatma Jotiba Phule


Today in Dalit History, in honor of Mahatma Phule Jayanthi, or birthday, we dedicate our post to Jyotirao Phule – an activist, a thinker, and a social revolutionary of the nineteenth century.

While he was not of a Dalit but a Shudra background, his ideals, works and actions have had an invaluable liberatory impact on Dalits.

Born April 11th 1827 before the widespread Adi-movements, Phule was the first to propound caste as a subjugation and oppression on an indigenous peoples by invaders. He stressed that caste was equivalent to slavery, as vicious and brutal as the enslavement of Africans in the Americas and unique in its deception and religious sanction.

Check alsoDalit History Month – Jhalkari Bai – A Legendary Dalit Woman Warrior

Mahatma Jotiba Phule

Mahatma Jotiba Phule

In his revolutionary book, Gulamgiri (Slavery) published in 1873, Jyotirao included a manifesto which amongst other things declared that he was willing to dine with all regardless of their caste, creed or country of origin and that social salvation was to be found only in the education of women and Dalits. This content was deemed extremely controversial at the time and several newspapers blatantly refused to publicize it.

He believed that Dalits were a group of people who had suffered added repression and persecution because they had at one time been actively engaged in fighting invading Brahmanism on the ground. His salvation describes the unity of the Shudras and Adi-Shudras (Dalits) into one exploited mass of people rising up in powerful political unity.

Read also – 

He and his wife, Savitribai Phule, became pioneers of women’s education in India, and together started the first school for girls on January 1st 1848 at Bhide’s wada in Pune. They also started schools in which they educated both girls and Dalits.

Like most Dalit and anti-caste revolutionaries, he felt a strong need to establish an alternative religion to the one that was oppressing his people. What he began then, lead him to form the Satya Shodhak Samaj (Society of Seekers of Truth) whose main objectives were to liberate the Shudras and Ati Shudras and prevent exploitation by Brahmins within a strong context of gender equality.

His life-long work for equality has recognized when Phule was publicly conferred the title of Mahatma on 11 May 1888 and later termed the “Martin Luther King of India” by his biographer Dhananjay Keer. Dr.Ambedkar proudly declared that Phule was one his three spiritual mentors. His birthday continues to be a celebration all around the world where Dalits honor him for Mahatma Phule Jayanthi.

Read also – Dalit History Month – Jhalkari Bai – A Legendary Dalit Woman Warrior

Please share the information with your friends. Follow the Dalit History Month on Facebook from here and check www.dalithistory.com

1 Comment

Filed under Dalit History, Dalit History Month, Dr B R Ambedkar, Mahatma Jotiba Phule, Today in Dalit History, Today in History

The Greatness of Mahatma Jotiba Phule


An Introduction:

In India, Maharashtra a state with cultural heritage and is also land of social thinkers, social reforms and social revolutionaries who have not only molded and enriched all facets of life of Maharashtra but have also made singular contribution to growth and development of India .In this website of the great social reformer – Mahatma Phule, contempory of KARL MARX, we have the “patria protesta” of the Indian social revolution and the first leader of peasants.

Mahatma Jotiba Phule

Mahatma Jotiba Phule

In those days there was a conflict between the rationalist and the orthodox. His period can, therefore, be a aptly described as the dawn of revolution in the history not only of Maharashtra but of the country as a whole in the various fields like Education, Caste Systems, Agriculture, Economics, Women and widow upliftment , Human Rights, Untouchability ,Social Equality.

Check also – Mahatma Jotiba Phule and Savitribai Phule’s contribution towards women empowerment

MAHATMA JYOTIRAO GOVINDRAO PHULE occupies a unique position among the social reformers of Maharashtra in the nineteenth century. While other reformers concentrated more on reforming the social institutions of family and marriage with special emphasis on the status and rights of women, Jotirao Phule revolted against the unjust caste system under which million of people had suffered for centuries. In particular, he courageously upheld the cause of the untouchables and took up the cudgels for the poorer peasants. He was a militant advocate of their rights. The story of his stormy life is an inspiring saga of a continuous struggle, which he waged relentlessly against the forces of reaction. What was remarkable was his ability to stand up against all kinds of pressure without faltering even once and act always according to his convictions. Though some keen observers of the social scene in Maharashtra like Narayan Mahadeo Parmanand did acknowledge his greatness in his lifetime, it is only in recent decades that there is increasing appreciation of his service and sacrifice in uplifting the masses.

Read also – What Mahatma Jotiba Phule Said

Childhood:

Jotirao Phule was born in 1827. His father, Govindrao was a vegetable vendor at Poona. Originally Jotirao’s family, known as Gorhays, came from Katugan, a village in the Satara district of Maharashtra. His grandfather Shetiba Gorhay settled down in Poona. Since Jotirao’s father and two uncles served as florists under the last of the Peshwas, they came to be known as ‘Phules’. Jotirao’s mother passed away when he was hardly one year old. After completing his primary education, Jotirao had to leave the school and help his father by working on the family’s farm. Jotirao’s marriage was celebrated when he was not even thirteen.

Continue reading

5 Comments

Filed under Dalit History, Dr B R Ambedkar, Mahatma Jotiba Phule, Today in Dalit History, Today in History

Rashtrapita Jotiba Phule’s memorial address to the education commission


[Jotiba Phule‘s deposition before the Education Commission in 1881 (also known as the Hunter Commission) is reproduced here from the book, Selected Writings of Jotirao Phule; this extract is recorded between pages 140-145 in Education Commission, Bombay, Vol II, Calcutta, 1884 – Round Table India]

~~~

My experience in educational matters is principally confined to Poona and the surrounding villages. About 25 years ago, the missionaries had established a female school at Poona, but no indigenous school for girls existed at the time. I, therefore, was induced, about the year 1854[1], to establish such a school, and in which I and my wife worked together for many years. After some time I placed this school under the management of a committee of educated natives. Under their auspices two more schools were opened in different parts of the town. A year after the institution of the female schools, I also established an indigenous mixed school for the lower classes, especially the Mahars and Mangs. Two more schools for these classes were subsequently added, Sir Erskine Perry, the president of the late Educational Board, and Mr. Lumsdain, the then Secretary to Government, visited the female schools and were much pleased with the movement set on foot, and presented me with a pair of shawls. I continued to work in them for nearly 9 to 10 years, but owing to circumstances, which it is needless here to detail, I seceded from the work. These female schools still exist, having been made over by the committee to the Educational Department under the management of Mrs. Mitchell. A school for the lower classes, Mahars and Mangs, also exists at the present day, but not in a satisfactory condition. I have also been a teacher for some years in a mission female boarding school. My principal experience was gained in connection with these schools. I devoted some attention also to the primary education available in this Presidency and have had some opportunities of forming an opinion as to the system and personnel employed in the lower schools of the Educational Department. I wrote some years ago a Marathi pamphlet exposing the religious practices of the Brahmins and incidentally among other matters, adverted therein to the present: system of education, which by providing ampler funds for higher education tended to educate Brahmins and the higher classes only, and to leave the masses wallowing in ignorance and poverty. I summarised the views expressed in the book in an English preface attached thereto, portions of which I reproduce here so far as they relate to the present enquiry:

”Perhaps a part of the blame in bringing matters to this crisis maybe justly laid to the credit of the Government. Whatever may have been their motives in providing ampler funds and greater facilities for higher education, and neglecting that of the masses, it will be acknowledged by all that injustice to the latter, this is not as it should be. It is an admitted fact that the greater portion of the revenues of the Indian Empire are derived from the ryot’s labour from the sweat of his brow. The higher and richer classes contribute little or nothing to the state exchequer. A well informed English writer states that our income is derived, not from surplus profits, but from capital; not from luxuries, but from the poorest necessaries. It is the product of sin and tears.”

Check also – Books by Mahatma Jotiba Phule

Mahatma Jotiba Phule

Mahatma Jotiba Phule

”That Government should expend profusely a large portion of revenue thus raised, on the education of the higher classes, for it is these only who take advantage of it, is anything but just or equitable. Their object in patronising this actual high class education appears to be to prepare scholars who, it is thought would in time vend learning without money and without price. If we can inspire, say they, the love of knowledge in the minds of the superior classes, the result will be a higher standard, of morals in the cases of the individuals, a large amount of affection for the British Government, and unconquerable desire to spread among their own countrymen the intellectual blessings which they have received.”

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Dr B R Ambedkar, Equal Rights, Mahatma Jotiba Phule

Slavery/Gulamgiri book by Mahatma Jotiba Phule in Hindi and English


Download Slavery/Gulamgiri book by Mahatma Jotiba Phule in Hindi from following link – 

Gulamgiri 

Download Slavery/Gulamgiri book by Mahatma Jotiba Phule in English from following links –

Mahatma Jotiba Phule

Mahatma Jotiba Phule

Check Also  – 

Mahatma Jotiba Phule and Savitribai Phule’s contribution towards women empowerment

What Mahatma Jotiba Phule Said

Books by Mahatma Jotiba Phule

6 Comments

Filed under Books, Dr B R Ambedkar, Mahatma Jotiba Phule, Savitribai Phule

Life Sketch of Mahatma Jyotiba Phule


Life Sketch of Mahatma Jyotirao Phule

Mahatma Jyotiba Phule

Mahatma Jyotiba Phule

Events Year
Birth of Mahatma Jyotirao Phule. 11th April, 1827
Marathi education in Panthoji’s school. 1834 to 1838
Married to Savitribai, the daughter of Khandoji Nevase at Naigaon. 1840
Primary education(English) in Missionary School. 1841 to 1847
Study of Thomas Paine’s book ‘Rights of Man’. 1847
Humiliation at marriage procession of upper caste friend. 1848
Started school for girls of shudra and atishudra. 1848
Left home with wife because of oath taken to educate the Shudras. 1849
Started girls school at Chiplunkar’s wada 1851
Major Candy felicitated Jyotiba Phule for his contribution in the field of education. 16 Nov. 1852
Joined a Scottish school as a part time teacher. 1854
Started night school. 1855
Took retirement from the management board of school. 1858
Helped in the remarriage of widows. 1860
Started Infanticide Prohibition Home. 1863
Death of Jotirao’s father Govindrao. 1868
Opened the well of his house to the untouchables. 1868
‘Chatrapati Shivaji Raje Bhonsle yancha povada’. 1st June, 1869
Gulamgiri. 1 June 1873
Formation of ‘Satya Shodhak Samaj’. 24 Sept. 1873
Procession of Dayanand Saraswati. 1875
Report of Pune’s branch of Satya Shodhak Samaj. 20 March 1877
Member of Pune Muncipality. 1876 to 1882
Made presentation to Hunter Education Commission. 19 Oct. 1882
Written the most famous book ‘Shetkarayacha Aasud (Cultivator’s Whipcord)’. 18 July 1883
Published the book ‘Ishara’ 1 Oct.1885
Junnar Court’s decision in favour of villager’s right 29 March 1885
Felicitated by Duke of Connaught. 2 March 1888
Felicitated by public and was honoured with the title of’ MAHATMA’ 11 May 1888
Started writing the book ‘Sarvajanik Satya Dharma Poostak’ 1st April 1889
Death of Mahatma Jotirao Phule. 28 Nov 1890

Check also –

Leave a comment

Filed under Dalit History, Dr B R Ambedkar, Mahatma Jotiba Phule